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One Life-Changing Class You Never Took: Alexa von Tobel at TEDxWallStreet

One Life-Changing Class You Never Took: Alexa von Tobel at TEDxWallStreet



Alexa von Tobel is the founder and CEO of LearnVest.com which she has been developing and growing since 2006. LearnVest is the leading personal finance …

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  1. I had the opportunity to attend a private church high school that offered a life skills class. Taught how to balance a check book, make a budget, cook from a recipe and even sew.

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  2. Ok. After watching all her capitalist lies.. I check her website:

    https://www.learnvest.com/pricing/

    and BAM!

    $299
    One-time setup fee
    + $19/mo
    On-going support

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  3. When my turns come my choice is " How to fly without wings"

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  4. So I don't get how jessica suddently got enough money to save up anyway. Is she just not going to have an apartment then?

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  5. really dislike this TED Talk. instead of explaining a story of what happens to millions and what millions are already facing , she should instead go in depth about compounding interest, 401k and matching, 529 and saving for college, and a lot more. also , as a finance major , there needs to be talked of accountability and going into a major that only produces so much money yet cost a lot more.

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  6. So true…. i was able to have my parents backing in finance, so I've done well working with a budget. I am no exception I lived well within my means to accomplish a goal this year. And I made a sacrifice to be poor, to become a real estate agent. I make my own schedule and I feel for free than I ever have. it really is a mindset… plus numbers lol! the numbers don't lie

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  7. hey ,if anyone else wants to discover best ways to save money try Renkarter Amazing Finance Report (do a google search ) ? Ive heard some great things about it and my cousin got cool success with it.

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  8. Well done

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  9. good message

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  10. Thanks for the Upload. Personal finance should be a prerequisite for everyone's education.

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  11. Great advice .

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  12. Some decent advice mixed with a lot of terrible advice. Credit score is "critical" to your financial future? Right, because paying interest to finance everything is such a great plan. Building assets is the key to financial success, not financing liabilities.

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  13. very interesting

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  14. And all of this starts with student loans. The problem isn't only that people don't know how to spent their money, it's that education is not free for everyone. Make. education. FREE!

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  15. Learnvest, selling common sense to poor people.

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  16. "Killing me softly with [her] words, killng me softly, with [her] words, telling my whole life, with [her] words, killng me softly, with [her] wooooooooords. Strumming my pain!" By the grace of God I picked a lucrative career, paid my student debt off, albeit 20 years post graduation, mortgaged a home (don't recommed it) and managed to keep my credit score in the high 700s (never a late or minimum payment-early and extra is the motto). Learning late but learning to dig myself out of the pit created by what she just described.

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  18. Alexa does a good job here. She has a lot of good material on the web.

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  19. Im a 19 year old college student and i loved this video so much. so much great info and i feel ahead of the game. THANK YOU!!!!

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  20. Right after highschool ( 18 yrs old ) i gave myself a choice. Either to go to college get a student loan or find a job doesnt matter if it pays well or not (at that time) .. I ended up going with the second option however i promised myself to be really keen with handling my income properly like tracking where my income would go, things i would buy etc … but i'd save most of my income id say 80% or more… I lived with my parents coz i know it would save me alot and avoided literally going out.. i was just focusing on the numbers… and at the same time i was putting money on mutual fund, GIC, TFSA ( i live in Canada ) etcc. i also wasnt screwing with any ladies at the time because didnt want to be distracted lol. Fast forward 2 years later… had 35gs in my bank account all diversified.. and i thought to myself hmmm ok life is getting boring… sooo got myself a girlfriend… couple months later we had a baby.. soo instead of renting i decided to put down some money towards a townhouse.. Me and my wife also saved up money for our baby on the way to help us out…. too makee a long storrry short if i would've went to college..i wouldve aquire student loan.. maybe drop out of college, have huge personal debt because college is stressfull and every student needs to party and let all go.. I'm 23 now already paying mortgage, not in debt except mortgage.. have a decent investment although it still neeeds to grow and i have a 1 year old.. and thinking about putting him to private school :)… nothing against college or education but you also got to take care of your personal finances coz the numbers are really going to define what life are you going to be able to afford down the road…. and yea they never teach that in highschool.. maybe they did.. but never paid attention….. thank god jst clicked in my head

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  21. where can I buy this class

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  22. Assuming the ROI on investments remains that high as debt declines.

    Banks gotta make money somehow.
    Debt isn't necessarily a bad thing. Debt can be a force for good when controlled properly. Debt isn't imprisonment, it can be freeing. Without a system of debt, lending, leverage, we're less free. The problem of course, is that people are irresponsible with debt, aside from the inherent risk. The problem is people seeing it as Monopoly money, imaginary numbers. Not tangible, physical cash.

    Plus, Jessica is pretty fucking boring. Pretty fucking undisciplined and pretty fucking monotonous. Not everyone wants to live so placidly like Jessica. In fact, whoever chooses to live like Jessica, deserves exactly what Jessica gets.

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  23. How to not be Jessica? My parents who didn't finish high school have told me the same too. This's too academic BS.

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  24. speed – 0.5, you're welcome

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  25. I wish I could have seen this at 20, would have saved me a lot of stress.

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  26. I did have a personal finance class in high school and it's offered in college. Honestly, though it just didn't really stick with me. I loved learning about it but I wish it would have been more extensive other then learning the basics and had been more interactive.

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  27. I would like to recommend The Financial Hero of New Era from Paul Mica. Inspiring book about complex personal finance and great lie of today's money.

    Reply

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